Antimicrobial Resistance and genes associated to the host-microbe interaction of Pasteurella multocida isolates from swine in Western Cuba

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Ivette Espinosa
M. Báez
J. Vichi
Siomara Martínez

Resumen

Pasteurella multocida is an important veterinary pathogen that causes a range of animal diseases, including fowl cholera, hemorrhagic septicemia in cattle and atrophic rhinitis in swine. P. multocida is generally recognized as a secondary invader contributing substantially to respiratory diseases in pigs by
aggravation of lung lesions. Five capsule serogroups are routinely identified in P. multocida (A, B, D, E, and F) and each is generally associated with, but not completely restricted, to a specific host. A total of 16 isolates of Pasteurella multocida capsular genotype A and two isolates capsular genotype D were characterized for their susceptibilities to 10 antibiotics and the presence of four genes for virulence factors associated to adherence. The use of PCR showed that colonization factors (ptfA), sialidases (nanH) and outer membrane proteins
(ompH) occurred in 100% porcine strains, while nanB as a further colonization-related gene was detected in
22% of isolates. The 94% of the isolates showed multiple-drug resistance. It was observed that 100% were resistant to amoxicillin and spectinomicin. The resistance profiles suggested that cephalosporins and sulphametozaxole were the drugs most likely to be active against P. multocida in vitro.

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Espinosa, I., Báez, M., Vichi, J., & Martínez, S. (2013). Antimicrobial Resistance and genes associated to the host-microbe interaction of Pasteurella multocida isolates from swine in Western Cuba. Revista De Salud Animal, 34(3), 151. Recuperado a partir de http://revistas.censa.edu.cu/index.php/RSA/article/view/5
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ARTÍCULOS ORIGINALES

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